Category: Indigenous peoples

Bolivia Update: Arce’s First Year

In October and November of 2019, clashes over the validity of presidential elections in Bolivia led to protests and the eventual ouster of the leftist Indigenous president Evo Morales, in what most observers characterized as a coup.  In the year . . .

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Transitioning Away from Animal Exploitation

An Interview with "Unpopular Scientist" Spencer Roberts

Anti-capitalist ecologist Spencer Roberts advocates a decolonial, just transition away from animal agriculture and wildlife extraction.

Settler Colonialism, Not a Nation of Immigrants

Review of Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz, Not “A Nation of Immigrants”: Settler Colonialism, White Supremacy, and a History of Erasure and Exclusion.

Open Letter to Editors of Jacobin and Monthly Review

Scholars and activists respond to the spirited attacks by Jacobin and Monthly Review on Yaku Pérez, the indigenous candidate in Ecuador’s presidential election.

Instead, They Awoke a Nation: Environmental Justice in Kahuku

New Politics editor’s note: This interview, originally published in Earth First! Journal‘s winter 2019-20 issue and posted here with permission, outlines Hawaii’s Ku Kia’i Kahuku environmental justice struggle against a large wind energy installation, the island’s tallest structure, in a . . .

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Indigenous Resistance Shakes the Canadian State

In early February, the RCMP, Canada’s colonial police force, raided the land defender camps of the Wet’suwet’en people in British Columbia, in order to clear the way for pipeline construction. Clearly, none of the political decision makers responsible for this . . .

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Anti-colonialism and Humanism

Anti-colonialism is understood to be both a group of historical events and a critical analysis of past and ongoing imperialisms.

Are You a Settler?

Settler-colonialism, Capitalism and Marxism on Turtle Island

The politics of solidarity on display during the fight against the Dakota Access Pipeline have raised the issue of Indigenous liberation more and more sharply to people on the left.

Who’s Who in Latin America’s Upheaval

Latin America is experiencing an abrupt change generated by enormous confrontations between the dispossessed and the privileged. This confrontation includes both revolts by the people and reactions by the oppressors.
The October Revolts
The uprising in Chile is the most important event . . .

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Unrest in West Papua

Resistance to the Indonesian government continues in West Papua, and it has a history.
Shortly after declaring independence in 1961, following the departure of the Dutch (who controlled the region), West Papua was invaded by Indonesian forces—Indonesia felt as though the . . .

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Bolivia: Evo’s Fall, the Fascist Right, and the Power of Memory

After nearly 14 years in power, the government of Evo Morales fell in a little less than a month, due to allegations of fraud and the desire to remain in power. Previously, Morales was a campesino leader, but this time . . .

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Will Evo’s resignation lead to Pinochet or resistance?

The coup d’état against Bolivian president Evo Morales has generated the kind of anguish that great defeats of revolutionary struggles evoke: Allende’s fall, Che’s death in combat, defeat in the Spanish Civil War. “Criticism is no passion of the head, . . .

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The Anti-Migrant International

In early December of 2017 the Trump Administration officially withdrew the United States from the UN Global Pact on Migration, claiming the 2016 accord “undermine[s] the sovereign right of the United States to enforce our immigration laws and secure our borders.” . . .

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A Growing National Strike Against Neoliberalism in Chile

Chile has exploded in social protests for the past several days, initially ignited by an increase in the metro fare. The initial protests developed into a national strike, even though conservative President Sebastián Piñera rescinded the four percent increase . . .

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Ecuadoran Women Protest Government’s Economic Policies and Repression

We, the women who resist – in the streets, in our territories, from our spaces and communities – we are the feminist sisters from Abya Yala, those who combat with our bodies, and sustain life; We sympathize with the criminalized, . . .

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The Amazon Burns and the Politics of Death: Resisting the Commodification of Our Future

The Bolsonaro administration is allowing the Amazon to burn as part of a project to accelerate capital accumulation, but is meeting massive resistance both at home and abroad.

Venezuela: A Country Held Hostage

Under the global spotlight for the past two months, Venezuela is perhaps the most debated and at the same time misunderstood country in recent times. The truth embraces demanding paradoxes: a country ruined but rich in resources, with a civilian-military . . .

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Forgotten voices in Venezuela crisis

Things are approaching a crisis point in the long battle of wills between Venezuela and the White House. Juan Guaidó, president of the opposition-controlled National Assembly, swore himself in as the country’s “interim president” before a crowd of tens (by . . .

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Race, Capitalism, and Resistance in the United States

 

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Introduction and My Experiences

“It is our duty to fight for our freedom. It is our duty to win. We must love and protect one another other. We have nothing to lose but our chains”.

You may recognize this as the rallying cry for the Black liberation movement in the United States, as written by Assata Shakur.

Hugo Blanco: The Future Is Indigenous

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On a gray Saturday afternoon in Lima, Peru, this past April, I received a phone call from Hugo Blanco, veteran guerilla and survivor of multiple death sentences. “You wanted to talk?” he asked. “Come over now.” An hour later, after a ride through the city’s torturous streets, I was in the plaza in front of his house, an unpretentious single-level in a middle-class neighborhood north of the colonial center. I knocked and collected myself; I hadn’t actually expected him to respond to my request.

After 121 Years, the First Indigenous Singer Performs at Brazil’s Teatro Amazonas

[1]Djuena Tikuna during her performance at the Teatro Amazonas. Image: screenshot, Jornalistas Livres (Youtube)

On 23 August, Djuena Tikuna [2] became the first indigenous singer to perform on the stage of the Teatro Amazonas [3] (“Amazonas Theatre”) — a bastion of European culture in the middle of the world’s largest tropical forest.

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