Author: newpolitics

The Cost of “Financial Literacy”

The book suggests that the key to ascending from the working class is to join the owning class through investing, where you can forever feed from the golden trough of passive-income, typically replenished by the working class you were once a part of.

Venezuela

How did Chavismo win 92% of the National Assembly?

The high abstention indicates that the working majority understood the irrelevance of the election. Voting could not have any impact on the disastrous national situation because the parliament had been de facto deprived of all its functions for several years.

Structures of Fossil Feeling

In this easily accessible, passionately argued intervention, Dawson gives the reader both a valuable primer on contemporary struggles for energy justice and an entry into the theoretical debates whose outcome will inform and guide movement strategy going forward.

As Biden Restores A Malignant “Normalcy,” It’s High Time The Left Declared Its Independence From The Democrats

It is misleading to see the election as a victory of democracy over authoritarianism. Biden’s win is the triumph not of democracy but of an oligarchic status quo, itself an increasingly authoritarian system.

The 2020 Elections in the United States: A Socialist View from Afar

Many of us watching with envy from afar—“envy” because the destruction of democratic institutions has gone much further in our countries—have nothing but admiration for the way in which a would-be dictator has been peacefully overthrown.

Once More on the Greater Evil

Stephen R. Shalom replies again on the question of voting for the lesser evil to defeat Trump.

The greater evil

A response to Charlie Post and Ashley Smith

Stephen R. Shalom criticizes the arguments against lesser-evil voting and makes the case for the Left both to support Biden and build the social movements.

No Justice, No Peace! Raising the Social Cost through Direct Action!

Growing numbers of individuals and growing social movements that have broken with the ideology that there is no alternative to neoliberalism (TINA) and acting on the belief that there is a liberatory alternative to racial capitalism is central to raising the social cost.

The Obliteration of Hiroshima

The moral case against the atomic bombing of Hiroshima.

The Movement for Black Lives Is Different This Time

Late May and early June saw the biggest wave of mass rebellion in the United States since the 1960s. Protests erupted in every major city and in all fifty states, demanding an end to racist police brutality. The character of these uprisings has been less like protests and more like rebellions.

On the World Economic Crisis

Eric Toussaint interviewed by Dan La Botz

Eric Toussaint discusses the origins and character of the current economic crisis and working class responses.

From Detroit to Minneapolis: Police Brutality is Key to Containing Revolutionary Possibilities

An exclusive excerpt from A People's History of Detroit.

An exclusive excerpt from A People’s History of Detroit

Debating Green Electoral Strategy

“We’ll definitely have more leverage over Biden, if we get a substantial vote, than over Trump, no doubt about that. But look, whoever’s in there, we got to have mass movements that aren’t tied to either party.”

May Day in Olympia!

For May Day, 2020, three car caravans converged at Washington’s State Capitol, yesterday, Friday, in our car caravan for Excluded and Essential workers. Our demands included full benefits, health care, unemployment benefits and the $1200 stimulus payment for all, no . . .

Read more ›

A New Period for Immigrant Rights Organizing

Demonstrations across the country have focused on the threats of Covid-19 outbreaks in jails holding detained immigrant workers, and the harsh measures taken by authorities to suppress calls for safer conditions.

Self-Extinction of Neoliberalism? Don’t Bet on It.

Neoliberalism will not disappear by itself; we need class struggle.

Old SDSers, New DSAers, and Trump vs. Biden

In a recent letter a group of old SDSers hoped to engage some young critics of the Democratic Party and Joe Biden. Those critics actually ought to be mightily commended for many of their analyses, insights, actions, intuitions, and feelings.
For example, the . . .

Read more ›

Strike statistics for 2019 are out. Is the strike wave continuing?

The 2012 Chicago teachers’ strike and the 2016 Verizon strike—the largest public sector and the largest private sector strikes in years, respectively—were warning shots.
After a short decline in strike activity in 2017, strike actions exploded in 2018 driven by West . . .

Read more ›

The undying revolutions in the Middle East and North Africa

Gilbert Achcar is a Professor of Development Studies and International Relations at SOAS University of London. He is the author of numerous books on the Middle East, including The People Want: A Radical Exploration of the Arab Uprising and Morbid Symptoms: Relapse in the . . .

Read more ›

The Irishman Cometh: Teamster History Hits the Big Screen (Again)

When I was working with the Teamster reform movement forty years ago, truck drivers concerned about union corruption had to proceed warily.
In the late 1970s, too many affiliates of the International Brotherhood of Teamsters (IBT) were run by grifters or . . .

Read more ›

On Gutter Journalism and Purported “Anti-Imperialism”

Gutter journalism is unfortunately not the preserve of openly right-wing tabloids. There has existed since the advent of Stalinism a “left-wing” strand of public mudslinging: Zhdanov was the counterpart of Goebbels. The Stalinist slander apparatus originally targeted the USSR’s left-wing . . .

Read more ›

Top