Author: newpolitics

The greater evil

A response to Charlie Post and Ashley Smith

Stephen R. Shalom criticizes the arguments against lesser-evil voting and makes the case for the Left both to support Biden and build the social movements.

No Justice, No Peace! Raising the Social Cost through Direct Action!

Growing numbers of individuals and growing social movements that have broken with the ideology that there is no alternative to neoliberalism (TINA) and acting on the belief that there is a liberatory alternative to racial capitalism is central to raising the social cost.

The Obliteration of Hiroshima

The moral case against the atomic bombing of Hiroshima.

The Movement for Black Lives Is Different This Time

Late May and early June saw the biggest wave of mass rebellion in the United States since the 1960s. Protests erupted in every major city and in all fifty states, demanding an end to racist police brutality. The character of these uprisings has been less like protests and more like rebellions.

On the World Economic Crisis

Eric Toussaint interviewed by Dan La Botz

Eric Toussaint discusses the origins and character of the current economic crisis and working class responses.

From Detroit to Minneapolis: Police Brutality is Key to Containing Revolutionary Possibilities

An exclusive excerpt from A People's History of Detroit.

An exclusive excerpt from A People’s History of Detroit

Debating Green Electoral Strategy

“We’ll definitely have more leverage over Biden, if we get a substantial vote, than over Trump, no doubt about that. But look, whoever’s in there, we got to have mass movements that aren’t tied to either party.”

May Day in Olympia!

For May Day, 2020, three car caravans converged at Washington’s State Capitol, yesterday, Friday, in our car caravan for Excluded and Essential workers. Our demands included full benefits, health care, unemployment benefits and the $1200 stimulus payment for all, no . . .

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A New Period for Immigrant Rights Organizing

Demonstrations across the country have focused on the threats of Covid-19 outbreaks in jails holding detained immigrant workers, and the harsh measures taken by authorities to suppress calls for safer conditions.

Self-Extinction of Neoliberalism? Don’t Bet on It.

Neoliberalism will not disappear by itself; we need class struggle.

Old SDSers, New DSAers, and Trump vs. Biden

In a recent letter a group of old SDSers hoped to engage some young critics of the Democratic Party and Joe Biden. Those critics actually ought to be mightily commended for many of their analyses, insights, actions, intuitions, and feelings.
For example, the . . .

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Strike statistics for 2019 are out. Is the strike wave continuing?

The 2012 Chicago teachers’ strike and the 2016 Verizon strike—the largest public sector and the largest private sector strikes in years, respectively—were warning shots.
After a short decline in strike activity in 2017, strike actions exploded in 2018 driven by West . . .

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The undying revolutions in the Middle East and North Africa

Gilbert Achcar is a Professor of Development Studies and International Relations at SOAS University of London. He is the author of numerous books on the Middle East, including The People Want: A Radical Exploration of the Arab Uprising and Morbid Symptoms: Relapse in the . . .

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The Irishman Cometh: Teamster History Hits the Big Screen (Again)

When I was working with the Teamster reform movement forty years ago, truck drivers concerned about union corruption had to proceed warily.
In the late 1970s, too many affiliates of the International Brotherhood of Teamsters (IBT) were run by grifters or . . .

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On Gutter Journalism and Purported “Anti-Imperialism”

Gutter journalism is unfortunately not the preserve of openly right-wing tabloids. There has existed since the advent of Stalinism a “left-wing” strand of public mudslinging: Zhdanov was the counterpart of Goebbels. The Stalinist slander apparatus originally targeted the USSR’s left-wing . . .

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The Revolution has Emerged: Sudan’s Acute Contradictions

In April, Sudan’s president, Omar al-Bashir, was ousted in a military coup. With the head of the regime cut off, a power struggle ensued between the military junta and the popular movement demanding civilian rule. In August, the main opposition . . .

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Gertrude Ezorsky, 1926-2019

Former New Politics board member Gertrude Ezorsky died on April 19, 2019, at the age of 92. The New Politics board mourns her passing and offers some links to help us remember her.
Andrew Wengrad and Nanette Funk, “Gertrude Ezorsky,” New Politics . . .

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Gertrude Ezorsky

Gertrude Ezorsky, professor emerita, in the philosophy departments of Brooklyn College, and the CUNY Graduate Center, died at home peacefully on April 19 age 92.

Puerto Rico: A U.S. Colony in the Caribbean

In 1898 the U.S. military invaded and seized Puerto Rico and Cuba during the Spanish-American War. Unlike Cuba, Puerto Rico has not yet achieved independence and the United States continues to exert political, economic, judicial, and military control over the . . .

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Moldova — Like Nothing Happens

It’s been more than a month since the crucial event in political life of Moldova took place – the February parliament elections. The elections define the future development of the country, which is a parliamentary republic.
This small Eastern European state . . .

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Coming to Terms with Actually-Existing Black Life

A Response to Mia White and Kim Moody

My central contention with both White and Moody lies in their reluctance to engage in meaningful class analysis of black political life.

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