From the Editors

[PDF][Print]

In this issue, we shift our focus toward domestic concerns, though we also look abroad with anxiety and trepidation.

Our last few issues have had international sections on Europe and on Asia and Africa. This time we look at the American scene. Dan La Botz provides a survey of recent independent and left political campaigns. Adam Gaffney and Lois Weiner look respectively at health care and education policy. Naomi Weisstein reflects on a moment in the history of the Women’s Liberation movement of the 1970s. Martha Rees interviews Adelina Nicholls of the Georgia Latino Alliance for Human Rights, providing us with a window on the fight for immigrant rights. Dave Finkel critically examines President Barack Obama’s foreign policy. Three of our book reviews also deal with American society and politics. Marty Oppenheimer reviews a new study of the Ku Klux Klan, Michael Hirsch reviews two books on the depredations of Wall Street, and E. Haberkern looks back at the radical social movements that once existed in today’s red states.

We continue to examine the disturbing state of the world in essays on a variety of nations and situations. Concerned, as we know you have been, about the situation in Ukraine we offer three pieces: by Joanne Landy, Kevin Anderson, and Sean Larson. We have in addition Niall Reddy’s assessment of Argentina under the Kirchners and Michael Pröbsting’s discussion of Chinese imperialism; we are also proud to publish James Kilgore’s Singer Prize winning essay on South Africa.

As always, we take up left theory as well: Ingo Schmidt considers Rosa Luxemburg’s economic theory, Michael Thompson offers an analysis and critique of Thomas Piketty’s Capital, and Kent Worchester reviews some recent books on CLR James.

Finally, and sadly, we remember some of our comrades, writers, and friends: Doug Ireland, Steve Kindred, and James Young, as well as cartoonist Phil Evans. Once again we thank Lisa Lyons for her illustrations on our cover and throughout the issue.

Dan La Botz
Stephen R. Shalom
Julia Wrigley

Image

Footnotes

About Author
DAN LA BOTZ is a Brooklyn-based teacher, writer and activist. He is a co-editor of New Politics.
Note from the editorial board:
If you’ve read this article to the end, you probably thought it was worth your time.
We hope you’ll also think it’s worth a few bucks (maybe more!) so that New Politics, run entirely by volunteers, can continue to give readers informative, timely analysis that is unswerving in its commitment to struggles for peace, freedom, equality, and justice — what we call socialism.
You have only a few weeks to donate to our annual fund appeal, during which we raise the money to publish. You can also subscribe, if you haven’t already. A digital-only sub is shockingly inexpensive and gets you our print issue weeks before the material is posted.
We won’t send you  a coffee mug, T-shirt, or tote bag.  What you’ll get instead is our thanks and a  deep, fuzzy satisfaction that you’ve contributed to bringing ideas that are more relevant than ever to new readers, helping to change the world.