Place: United States

Essential Workers: Class Struggle in the Time of Coronavirus

A newscast on SUR Peru Sunday showed residents of Lima at their windows clapping and thanking the masked sanitation workers loading bags of trash into a garbage truck. The screen read, “Coronavirus: Cleaning in Lima, Anonymous Heroes.” Residents knew whose . . .

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The Coronavirus Strikes and their Significance, So Far

Across the United States we are seeing workers walk off the job in wildcat strikes in response to the employers’ failure either to shut down the workplace or to make it safe. The strikes are too few to call them . . .

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Biden Should Drop Out Amid Credible Assault Allegation

Content Warning: Sexual Assault and Harassment
I just listened to former Senate aide Tara Reade vividly, calmly, and tearfully recount how the presumed Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden nonconsensually penetrated her with his fingers. Reade was a staff assistant to Biden . . .

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An Ideological War

I believe that there is an ideological war going on right now and that the left needs to be prepared to do battle. In the very first days of this crisis, we saw moratoriums on evictions, expedited unemployment benefits, CA . . .

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America Faces the Deluge

This article was written for L’Anticapitaliste, the biweekly newspaper of the New Anticapitalist Party (NPA) of France.
The United States stands before the deluge. Coronavirus is spreading, the economy is collapsing, anxiety is everywhere. Federal and state government responses were slow and . . .

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A Medical, Economic and Social Crisis

The global coronavirus outbreak is not (fortunately) the end of civilization, nor is it (unfortunately) the end of capitalism. It is, however, a very deep systemic crisis with interlocking public health, environmental and economic dimensions — and reveals the need . . .

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The Agony of Academic Labor

A Response to Curtis Rumrill

When I first considered writing a retort to Curtis Rumrill’s piece, “Why These Wildcats Will Weaken Us,” I thought it best to refute his argument on the grounds of its many inaccuracies. A retort . . .

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Fifteen Years of Urban Entrepreneurialism: Lessons from New Orleans

It has been fifteen years since Hurricane Katrina descended on the Gulf Coast, leaving mass destruction in its wake. New Orleans, one of the places most severely hit, was left eighty percent under . . .

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Will Omar’s PEACE Plan Bring Peace?

Rep. Ilhan Omar put forward the Pathway to PEACE (Progressive, Equitable, and Constructive Engagement), a package of seven bills to move U.S. foreign policy in a progressive direction on Feb. 12. Ironically it . . .

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Human Rights Violations in New York City and the Urgency to Alleviate Suffering

On January 31, 2019 Housing and Urban Development Secretary Ben Carson and New York Mayor Bill DeBlasio conducted a rushed press conference where they signed an agreement between Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and the New York City Housing Authority . . .

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Instead, They Awoke a Nation: Environmental Justice in Kahuku

New Politics editor’s note: This interview, originally published in Earth First! Journal‘s winter 2019-20 issue and posted here with permission, outlines Hawaii’s Ku Kia’i Kahuku environmental justice struggle against a large wind energy installation, the island’s tallest structure, in a . . .

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Can Bernie Sanders Make the Democratic Party a Democratic Party?

The Democratic Party has been a perennial subject of hope, betrayal and befuddlement for so many on the left, in part because it’s so hard to define. It can accurately be described . . .

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VoteVets for Buttigieg: Who’s Really Keeping Us in The Dark About Campaign Funding?

In a Democratic primary field that once featured four military veterans, only two are still marching toward the White House.
Congresswoman Tulsi Gabbard’s “anti-war” candidacy has sunk nearly out of sight, but Pete Buttigieg, former mayor of South Bend, Indiana, became . . .

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Race, Class and Electoral Politics: A Book Review

The main purpose of this book is to guide the messaging of Democrats as they run for office. In spite of this it has useful insights about popular consciousness and how to move people against racism.

Strike statistics for 2019 are out. Is the strike wave continuing?

The 2012 Chicago teachers’ strike and the 2016 Verizon strike—the largest public sector and the largest private sector strikes in years, respectively—were warning shots.
After a short decline in strike activity in 2017, strike actions exploded in 2018 driven by West . . .

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Why we should be wary of blaming ‘overpopulation’ for the climate crisis

The annual World Economic Forum in Davos brought together representatives from government and business to deliberate how to solve the worsening climate and ecological crisis. The meeting came just as devastating bush fires were abating in Australia. These fires are thought to have killed . . .

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Nine Years Against Assad

As Bashar al-Assad brutally crushes the last areas not under his control, Joseph Daher, Syrian socialist activist, gave this wide-ranging interview to the UK-based journal Socialist Resistance.

“Politics Isn’t Poker”: A Response to Andy Sernatinger on DSA and Bernie Sanders

Andy Sernatinger’s New Politics article “Bern After Reading: Sanders and Socialist Strategy” raises important questions to think through, whether you’re a member of Democratic Socialists of America or not. Even in the heat of the moment—and the Sanders challenge is . . .

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Philly Educators Have a Chance to Make History

Members of the Philadelphia Federation of Teachers (PFT) have a chance to improve lives of Philly school educators and students, challenging control of schools by corporate elites, as did Chicago teachers when they elected a new generation of leaders from . . .

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Bern After Reading: Sanders and Socialist Strategy

In March of 2019, the Democratic Socialists of America (DSA) endorsed Bernie Sanders’ bid for President of the United States. DSA members voted on an advisory referendum that simply asked if the Democratic Socialists of America should endorse Bernie Sanders . . .

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Institutional Obstacles Can be Overcome

This essay is a reply to “Problems with an Electoral Road to Socialism in the United States,” published in the Winter 2020 issue of New Politics. – Editors

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