Place: North America

The Significance of Occupy Wall Street

Ten years ago Occupy Wall Street, a national mass movement against economic inequality and the influence of corporate money in politics, began in New York City and then spread across the country until it involved tens of thousands in dozens of other cities and towns.

U.S. Imperialism in Afghanistan and Beyond

For the family members of the victims, the 9/11 attacks were a tragedy, but for the Bush administration and the U.S. ruling class, they were a golden opportunity.

Settler Colonialism, Not a Nation of Immigrants

Review of Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz, Not “A Nation of Immigrants”: Settler Colonialism, White Supremacy, and a History of Erasure and Exclusion.

Millions Lose Government Assistance and Protection; Biden Mandates Vaccination

This month millions of Americans lost government unemployment benefits and millions more are losing protection from eviction.

Mobbed-Up! The Untold Story of Sean O’Brien and Teamsters Local 25: A Rank-and-File Perspective

O’Brien is a man who will stop at nothing to achieve his ends. His past attacks on reformers demonstrate that he is a bully.

Three Authors Look at Work's Devastation of Life

How Work Is Killing Us

Three authors—Jamie McCallum, Sarah Jaffe, and Eyal Press– have published important books that examine work and its discontents, in pre-pandemic form.

We Anti-Zionists Speak for a Quarter of U.S. Jews

The newest poll numbers show that a quarter of U.S. Jews fundamentally oppose the Zionist project.

Texas Anti-Abortion Law Upheld by Supreme Court—And Met with Resistance

The Texas law will not only affect the seven million women of childbearing age in Texas, but could also become a model for other states. It could also spark a new women’s movement, letting people know that Women’s Lives Matter.

Going into Labor

Going into Labor

Expecting working people to do the jobs for which they are paid and also help organize their workplaces is a huge ask. One invaluable asset we have is seeing the inseparability of struggles for social justice and workplace democracy.

Recovering the Dialectic of Race and Class Struggle in the USA

In Defense of Richard Wright & Cedric Johnson’s Actually Existing Black Marxism

Insights from Richard Wright and Cedric Robinson lend support to Cedric Johnson’s view of Black Marxism.

The IPCC’s Sixth Assessment Report: A Green-Syndicalist Analysis

Since publication of its first assessment report in 1990, the IPCC has borne witness to the ever-worsening problem of anthropogenic climate disruption, together with what amounts to humanity’s suicidal failure to address the factors threatening collective destruction.

Solidarity, Inc. Part III: The absence of protest

Perhaps the most fatal of the teenage anti-imperialist’s distractions was their argument Western governments were actually supporting the dangerous Islamists in Syria they ‘pretended’ to be bombing.

On Remembering Stanley Aronowitz

Brother Stanley Aronowitz was always ahead of the curve, with his criticism of the shortcomings of old labor and his envisioning of “a new workers movement” that might replace it.

Satire and Healing

A Conversation with Singer/Songwriter Roy Zimmerman

An interview with the political singer-songwriter whose anti-Trump song got over 100 million views on social media.

Learning about Prisons

A Personal Reflection

Even before I’d been inside a prison, I was sympathetic to the circumstances of some people who are incarcerated.
I’d twice interviewed former professional boxer Rubin “Hurricane” Carter, who spent almost twenty years in prison for a crime he didn’t commit. . . .

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Medicare for All Is Not Enough

The Two Souls of Socialized Medicine

While Medicare for All may be a necessary first step toward change in healthcare, it cannot challenge the quality, or current culture and class basis, of the way contemporary healthcare is delivered.

DSA’s Flawed International Outlook: The Appeal of the Mass Party and its Contradictions

There’s something contradictory in this position that needs to be pointed out. The parties that DSA has focused on weren’t always mass parties. Often, they began as just the kind of plebeian networks or far left grouplets that DSA eschews as irrelevant.

American Gothic; or, What Melville Can Teach Us

What Melville crafted might paradoxically be called a gothic humanism. While probing the depths of human depravity with lyricism and wit, Melville’s fiction directly confronted slavery and capitalism.

Can a Disoriented Storming of the Center Lead to Organizational Maturity?

Why was the American far right, the least organized among advanced capitalist nations, able to mount the (apparently) most threatening attack on the institutions of liberal democracy?

Some Good News–Support for Palestinians is Growing

It may be hard to believe, but against the background of daily killings of Palestinians and statements of blanket support for Israel by Imperial Leader Biden, there is some good news. Many Israelis are courageously denouncing Israeli apartheid and support for Palestinians has been growing fast around the world and in some unusual places.

How Contingent Faculty Organizing Can Succeed in Higher Education

Power Despite Precarity is not just a solid guide to best practices in day-to-day trade union work within higher education. It’s also a rousing call for the contingent faculty movement to embrace grassroots, rather than top-down, organizing.

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