Category: Political Economy
review

The Case for Socialism

From a Management Scholar

Various books have been published in the last few years that make a case for a transition to socialism. This one has a special “edge”: it’s written by the Harold Quinton chair of business policy, and professor of . . .

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Continuing the Discussion on Black Politics

Replying to Cedric Johnson: I think Johnson over-diagnoses the problem. Where he sees danger, I see opportunity and where I see opportunity, he sees danger.

Are You a Settler?

Settler-colonialism, Capitalism and Marxism on Turtle Island

The politics of solidarity on display during the fight against the Dakota Access Pipeline have raised the issue of Indigenous liberation more and more sharply to people on the left.

The Historical Retrieval and Controversy of Walter Rodney’s Russian Revolution

The posthumous publication of Walter Rodney’s book on the historiography of the Russian Revolution is a remarkable accomplishment of historical retrieval, and it provides us with an opportunity to look more deeply into Rodney’s relationship to Marxism, Soviet . . .

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The Puerto Rican Summer

The summer of 2019 will go down as a major moment in Puerto Rico’s history. Between July 10 and 25, street protests—unprecedented in their intensity, persistence, diversity, and size—led to an unprecedented result: The Island’s highest government official . . .

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The Sandy Next Time

As the water rose 
to occupy Wall Street, 
ten thousand helicopters 
flew massed dollars out 
lest all that cabbage salt to slaw 
and the balance of payments 
blow out to sea. 
 
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Neo-Colonial Economics in Central Africa: A Very Short History

Word War Two as the death-knell for colonial empires is a well-trodden and essentially erroneous narrative. Empires’ relationships with their colonies were uprooted, modified and given the gloss of ‘independence’ but retained injustice and exploitation at their core. In Central . . .

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Frank Gaudichaud: “We are at the beginning of the end of neoliberalism in Chile”

Franck Gaudichaud is a specialist of contemporary Chile, president of the association France Amerique Latine and member of the editorial board of Contretemps. He is a political scientist and teaches Latin American history at the University of Toulouse Jean Jaurès, France. Here he develops several hypothesis bout Chile and the development of the current mobilization which has been ongoing since mid-October.

Global Economic Volatility and Sociopolitical Reactions

Trade and currency wars, financial volatility and economic turbulence are now the most important features of the world economy.

The elements of a new international financial crisis are in place. Although we do not know when it will break out, it . . .

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Sunday September 22: Livestream International Labor Solidarity Dialogue

Facebook Livestream Dialogue between Chinese, Algerian, Sudanese, Iranian, Venezuelan and U.S. Labor Activists on International Labor Solidarity.

Global Warming, “Grass” Farming and a Planned Economy

As the Global Climate Strike date (Sept. 20) approaches, the question that will be on the minds of millions will be: “Is there a possible way to avoid a disaster that could threaten the existence of life on earth?” Michael . . .

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U.S. and China Conflict: The 21st Century’s Central Inter-Imperial Rivalry

Editors’ note: This is the first of three articles providing analysis of what’s happening now in China – and why.

The Ruling Class Does Rule

Throughout the mid-20th century, discussions and theoretical debates concerning the nature of the capitalist state persisted within Marxist circles. Some names are tightly connected with these events, including Ralph Miliband, Nicos Poulantzas, and Fred Block. In the end, it appeared that . . .

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Great Power Rivalry in the Early Twenty-first Century

One of the most important issues of our time is the intensifying rivalry between the imperialist Great Powers: the United States, China, the EU, Russia, and Japan. Diplomatic rows, sanctions, trade wars, military tensions, and, ultimately, major wars now loom . . .

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Beyond Brexiternity?

The British Crisis and the Left

None of the Brexit three options will achieve any kind of consensus; any of them could happen.

The Endless Brexit Crisis: Interview with Neil Davidson

The British political system has been thrown into turmoil since the summer of 2016, when a narrow majority of voters supported a referendum in favor of Britain leaving the European Union (EU). The Conservative Party government headed by Prime Minister . . .

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The Tendency for the Rate of Profit to Decline—And Why It Matters

The law of the tendency for the rate of profit to decline has been the focus of an immense and on-going debate since the publication of Vol.III of Capital in 1894. In what follows, . . .

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Theoretical Lies of the World Bank

In 2019, the World Bank (WB) and the IMF will be 75 years old. These two international financial institutions (IFI), founded in 1944, are dominated by the USA and a few allied major powers who work to generalize policies that . . .

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South Africa: Something’s Got to Give

The election of a new government should be a time of celebration. 25 years since the end of Apartheid should be the time of immense celebration. Yet, 25 years since the “dawn of democracy” and South Africans are engulfed by . . .

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It’s Profitability: A Response to “Why Stagnation?”

Recently in the Marxist Sociology blog, David Kotz, Professor Emeritus of Economics and Sheridan Scholar at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and Distinguished Professor in the School of Economics at the Shanghai University of Finance and Economics offered an explanation as . . .

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Are we at a tipping point? Assessing the US political terrain

“Liberal democracy is crumbling.” A Harvard Law Professor opened a recent talk with this matter-of-fact statement and the audience readily murmured its assent.
The daily headlines certainly seem to confirm this assessment—that we are a nation in crisis. Yet, the nature . . .

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