Russia: The Revolution and Beyond, continued

Our last issue included a special section on “Russia: The Revolution and Beyond,” with articles by Thomas Harrison, Dan La Botz, Saeed Rahnema, and Stephen Shalom. In this issue, we continue with articles by Samuel Farber, Thomas Harrison (part 2), and Stefanie Prezioso, and an interview with Suzi Weissman.

In this symposium:

One Hundred Years of the Russian Revolution: A Retrospective View

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At a distance of one hundred years, the Russian Revolution, which truly shook the world, deserves to be remembered once more in terms of its emancipatory significance and its downfall and betrayal. This revolution would not have happened had it not been for the crucial role played by the Bolshevik party. It is true that the profound crisis affecting the Russian society, worsened by the country’s disastrous participation in World War I, could have sooner or later led to a massive upheaval. But it is questionable that a socialist revolution would have taken place without the organizational skills of the Bolshevik party and the political, strategic, and tactical genius of V.I. Lenin.

The Russian Revolution, Soviets, and Socialist Democracy

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“Revolutions are the mad inspiration of history”

Leon Trotsky, My Life

 

Antonio Gramsci: From War to Revolution

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Eighty years after his death, Antonio Gramsci is among the most influential Marxist intellectuals across the board. By the end of World War II, liberal intellectuals had already found in him “a Marxist you can take home to Mother.” The tone was set by Benedetto Croce, who allegedly gushed in 1947, upon reading Gramsci’s Prison Notebooks, “He’s one of us!”1 It reached the point that the Sardinian activist can be presented today as no less than the guarantor of “Italian Democracy.”2

The Tragic Fate of Workers’ Russia

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[This is the second of three articles commemorating the Russian Revolution of 1917 and analyzing its fate under Stalin. The first part, “Glorious Harbinger of a New Society: the Bolshevik Revolution,” was published in the previous issue of New Politics, number 62, winter 2017. The text below is slightly expanded from what appeared in the print issue.]

 Soon after the Treaty of Brest-Litovsk was signed on March 3, 1918, the Soviet republic was under siege. Various anti-Bolshevik forces, some supported by the Allies or the Central Powers, were gathering. If these forces succeeded in reversing the October Revolution, what would be the result?

 

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